It Ziehms to Me: Florida Historic Golf Trail is something special

Len Ziehm on GolfBy Len Ziehm

Golf trails are nothing new. Courses and clubs have formed marketing partnerships for years with varying degrees of impact.

In the United States alone there are at least 50 trails. Texas has five separate of them. Colorado Golf Trails is one marketing entity, but it promotes 10 different trails within that state, and some of those trails have as many of 12 courses. Go to http://www.golftrips.com/golftrails/ to check out the various trails out there.

Golfers of all abilities have enjoyed Riviera for 62 years.

Golfers of all abilities have enjoyed Riviera for 62 years.

Most famous is probably the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, which unites 11 Alabama golf facilities. It’s been a rousing commercial success, but some of the “trails’’ amount to nothing more than websites.

I’ve played all the courses on Indiana’s Pete Dye Golf Trail and some courses on a few of the others, including the Robert Trent Jones. This winter, though, I’ve been introduced to one that is different – and in some ways better – than all the others. Continue reading

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GolfVisions to enhance the golf operations at Valparaiso golf courses

Tim Miles, Sr.

The City of Valparaiso, Indiana, Parks Department and GolfVisions Management, Inc. are pleased to announce the formation of a partnership wherein GolfVisions will work closely with the City’s Parks and Recreation staff to enhance the golf operations at Forest Park Golf Course and Creekside Golf Course & Training Center.

Goals of the partnership include bolstering player development and retention programs, sustaining/improving upon current levels of usage, optimizing use of human, physical and capital resources, and improving the City’s financial position with respect to golf operations.

The Park Board approved hiring GolfVisions for a two-year consulting term in a unanimous vote on January 27. Continue reading

It Ziehms to Me: Senior Women’s Open is finally a reality

Len Ziehm on GolfBy Len Ziehm

The U.S. Golf Assn. has finally committed to holding a national championship for senior women players. Though long overdue, that’s good news.

On the other hand, the first such tournament won’t be held until 2018 and there will be differences between the first U.S. Senior Women’s Open and the only other major event for senior women, which is put on by the LPGA Legends Tour.

French Lick’s Pete Dye Course hosts the only major championship for senior women now, but that will change in 2018.

French Lick’s Pete Dye Course hosts the only major championship for senior women now, but that will change in 2018.

The Legends Championship has been played the last two years at the Pete Dye Course in French Lick, Ind., which is also the site of the Legends Hall of Fame. The Legends event is over 54 holes; the first U.S. Senior Women’s Open will be over 72 holes.

Players can ride in the Legends event, won the first two years by Lorie Kane and Laurie Rinker. As per USGA tradition in open championships, the Senior Women’s Open will be walking-only. And, of course, the Legends is for former LPGA players while both amateurs and professionals can compete in the Senior Women’s Open.

Continue reading

Spring Training by Bill Abrams

By Bill Abrams PGA, Golf Solutions Academy, Balmoral Woods

It’s that time of year again. The Masters is less than two months away and we will be outdoors playing this awesome game very soon. This is a great time to get some “spring training” in prior to those first swings outside. There are a few things we all can do to help prepare for the season. Below are a few you can do at home, but as always practicing at a dome or heated tee is great.

Bill Abrams - grip side viewBill Abrams - grip front viewGrip is an area we need to monitor to keep shots from being inconsistent. Be sure your top hand (left hand for a right handed player) thumb is on top of the shaft and the club is more to the fingers than the palm. The only real pressure should be in the thumb and index finger of the top hand. This will allow the club to rotate properly and help prevent the dreaded chicken wing. The bottom hand should have the club rest in the fingertips as well. The top hand thumb will fit into the bottom hand lifeline naturally in a proper grip. Be sure to monitor the pressure and see how lightly you can grip the club – tension and excitement can increase pressure and go largely unnoticed. This can be practiced virtually anywhere you have a club handy. Watch a video to help with your grip. Continue reading